5 Reasons to use Analytics

1. It’s Free

analytics blog demographicsWhen you’re talking about using analytics or not, it’s really a matter of why wouldn’t you at least collect the data? Even if you don’t have time to study the analytics now, you’re building a stockpile of statistics which can be studied in the future. There is no cost associated with collecting the data. The potential cost is in the time it takes to interpret and use the statistics to help your business. This may be your time or a professional you hire to analyze the data for you.

2. It’s not rocket science

Google AnalyticsIf you’ve never looked into your website’s analytics, you may think it holds tables of data which you would have to spend weeks trying to understand. The truth is that much of the data analysis is already done for you and is presented in a format which is simple to interpret and intuitive.

3. You can track changes

Google AnalyticsWhen you make a change to your website or run a marketing campaign, it is likely that you will see a change in traffic to your site or a change in the traffic flow within your site. By using analytics, you will see the impact of a change. For instance: if you launch a new design on your site, is it holding a visitor’s attention? Has your bounce rate changed or the average number of pages a new potential client looks at. Likewise, if you have launched a responsive design website, does the bounce rate for mobile devices and tablets drop as would be expected (as your site would have been difficult to read and navigate without the responsive design).

4. Get to know your customers

Google AnalyticsYou might think you already have a good idea who your customer base is, and that is probably true. Analytics brings concrete evidence of where they are, who they are,  when they are searching your site, how they are finding your site and the flow of traffic through your site. How does that help? Well, it could help to target a new promotion or it may point to a fundamental flaw in your site if a large proportion of your visitors are not finding the pages you are trying to promote. It’s also a great way to find out leads generated through your social media. If your return on investment is not as expected, it could be time to rethink your strategy.

5. Shape your future

Becoming an expert on your site performance gives you the confidence and tools to plan ahead. It also empowers you to persuade others within the company or outside that you can manage your business effectively. The data can be used to backup a case for

  • a business loan
  • renewing a business visa
  • expansion (or conversely – downsizing)
  • verifying your business model is working

If you’re ready to start analyzing and want some help with your site, contact us today  info@trulium.com

Exploring bounce rates

What is a bounce rate?

First things first, let’s clear up the definition of a bounce rate. When related to websites, the bounce rate is the statistic which tells you how many visitors click on your site and then leave without further exploring your site.

For example, 50 people visit the home page of your website on one particular day.  35 of them click around the site accessing menus like packages or pricing and the other 15 don’t look further on your site (it doesn’t matter if they go to another site or just stop the session there). The bounce rate is

15/50 X 100% = 30%

Your bounce rate can be found in the analytics for your site.

Need I worry about a high bounce rate?

 

This depends on what you want your site to achieve.  A very high bounce rate can actually be a good thing if you are attracting the visitors you want and they are getting all they need from just one page on your site.

Examples would include:

  • directions to your business – your page is clear enough to get people to your address
  • opening hours – a visitor is interested in your service and just needs to know when to visit
  • contact information

Obviously, the smaller the amount of content on the site, the more likely the design can cram valuable content into that first page that the visitor ‘lands on’ (usually the home page).

 

How can understanding bounce rates help me?

This is where the value of the statistics really kicks in. Instead of just knowing the figures, we can use them to help tweak the site. From the raw data, it is impossible to know why your visitor didn’t click on more pages:

  • the site was boring
  • your site took too long to load
  • your site content is poor and you are being presented in search engines when other sites would be more appropriate
  • it’s unclear how to navigate around the site
  • the site looks overwhelming with blocks of text
  • worst of all – the site wasn’t easily recognized as yours due to lack of branding or an inconsistent message so you did all the hard work in getting that engagement and then failed to capitalize
  • the website was hard to read, literally (this is especially relevant from tablets and mobile devices)
  • all the information required was gathered on the landing page

Analytics can help tackle the ‘responsive design’ issue easily – if your bounce rate is being influenced by poor interaction from tablets or phones.

Look at the data inside the section

Audience -> Mobile -> Overview

bounce rates

 

The first column will display how your visitors are accessing your site. In this case, nearly 47% use mobile devices, about 45% use desktops, and only 8% use tablets. Understanding this pattern will help you know if it is worth looking at the experience a mobile device user is having. If 90% plus of your clients are accessing your site from a desktop, it may be worth concentrating on them. This is highly unlikely and the trend towards mobile and away from desktops shows no sign of slowing.

bounce rates2

Following the data table along, look at ‘bounce rate’ as well as ‘pages per session’ and ‘average session duration’. If the visitors to your site are having trouble navigating your pages or reading your text, you would expect the bounce rate for those devices to be significantly higher than from a desktop. That would also translate into a lower number of pages viewed per session and a shorter session duration. In this example the site has the highest bounce rate from a desktop and the other values (between the two device types that make up over 91% of the traffic together) are very similar. The conclusion would be that this site is mobile friendly.

If you’re looking for help with your website, why not contact us today  info@trulium.com

Making Google Analytics Work for Your Website

Ever started a diet but not tracked your calories? If so, you probably found out fast it was harder to lose weight without knowing that information. Using Google Analytics to bolster your company’s website and potential is a similar process. Google Analytics is a valuable tool that can give you many useful metrics such as:

  • the number of unique visitors to your pages;
  • where your visitors are coming from;
  • web browsers used by your visitors; and
  • keywords used to find you.

Like our dieting analogy, knowledge from those metrics is powerful. You can use metrics to make adjustments to your pages, your Search Engine Optimization strategy, or your website in general to make it more appealing to your current and potential customers.

“Need another reason to consider using Google Analytics? How about for tracking e-commerce? According to InternetRetailer.com, e-retail spending is expected to increase by 62% by 2016.”

We, at Trulium, are here to help you make the most of your Google Analytics reports.

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