SEO benefits of long tail keywords

Long Tail Keywords – one key to SEO success

If you’re unfamiliar with the world of SEO (search engine optimization) then even the title of this blog may sound strange – bizarre even. So let’s take a closer look into what long tail keywords are (and aren’t) before we decide if they are valuable in your SEO strategy.

What are long tail keywords?

These are search strings which your potential clients may be keying into a search engine where you want your company to be in the running for their business. They tend to be several words (three generally at a minimum) and are less generic than their one or two worded counterparts – often referred to as ‘short tail keywords’. The best way to demonstrate is with examples.

These are examples of short tail keywords

  • necklaces
  • soup
  • gutter
  • weed killer

They are made up of one or two words (typically) and will be very popular search terms across all search engines as they could be a good starting point for consumers to start researching a purchase or service.

As the consumers search around, they may hone in on something more specific. Perhaps the necklace they want is silver, perhaps the weed killer has to target their particular problem which happens to be dandelions, perhaps they are not looking to buy a new gutter but instead want to clean out a blocked gutter.

Long tail keywords could then be the search strings they switch to using. Here are some examples following on from the list above

  • silver unicorn necklace online
  • Italian minestrone soup recipe
  • Tools to help clean a blocked gutter
  • Pet friendly Dandelion weed killer

SEO Analysis

Using online tools, it’s possible to analyze these terms further to demonstrate the difference between the traffic volumes with these search strings. Let’s use the ‘soup’ as our example here.

In one month, the term ‘soup’ is searched for 30.3k-70.8k times (that’s a lot of searches!). That could be made of of recipes, reviews, grocery promotion, diets, definitions, cookbooks, tutorials, menus, the history of soup, most popular soup, gourmet soup, budget soup … you get the picture, the list goes on and on precisely because the search term is so generic and broad.

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In the same month, the term “Italian minestrone soup recipe” was searched between 501-850 times – significantly less – but if you are trying to attract a following and have an awesome Italian minestrone soup recipe, the people who did key in that search string (because that is precisely what they wanted) will have a better chance of finding  you.

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Changing your strategy

If you leverage your SEO to look at some of these long tail keywords, not only will you have a better chance of ranking in the SERP (search engine results page) – which means even if you have a small business you could still rank highly, the people who do click on your link are more likely to be looking for content like yours as the wheat has been sorted from the chaff (the field of search has been narrowed and unrelated results are filtered out). This should translate to

  • a lower bounce rate – that means your visitors are more likely to like what they see when they do click and further explore your site
  • a greater chance of achieving your marketing goal whether that is building a following or selling a product / service

Both of those outcomes are advantageous to your business and you’ve managed to reach your ideal online contact.

SEO Denver

Ultimately, the key to success lies in finding the right mix of keywords for your business. It might not be a quick process, but it could be well worth investigating. You are the expert in your business, if you want to switch up your SEO with some long tail keywords, let us help you with a plan. Contact us today  info@trulium.com

 

 

 

Exploring bounce rates

What is a bounce rate?

First things first, let’s clear up the definition of a bounce rate. When related to websites, the bounce rate is the statistic which tells you how many visitors click on your site and then leave without further exploring your site.

For example, 50 people visit the home page of your website on one particular day.  35 of them click around the site accessing menus like packages or pricing and the other 15 don’t look further on your site (it doesn’t matter if they go to another site or just stop the session there). The bounce rate is

15/50 X 100% = 30%

Your bounce rate can be found in the analytics for your site.

Need I worry about a high bounce rate?

 

This depends on what you want your site to achieve.  A very high bounce rate can actually be a good thing if you are attracting the visitors you want and they are getting all they need from just one page on your site.

Examples would include:

  • directions to your business – your page is clear enough to get people to your address
  • opening hours – a visitor is interested in your service and just needs to know when to visit
  • contact information

Obviously, the smaller the amount of content on the site, the more likely the design can cram valuable content into that first page that the visitor ‘lands on’ (usually the home page).

 

How can understanding bounce rates help me?

This is where the value of the statistics really kicks in. Instead of just knowing the figures, we can use them to help tweak the site. From the raw data, it is impossible to know why your visitor didn’t click on more pages:

  • the site was boring
  • your site took too long to load
  • your site content is poor and you are being presented in search engines when other sites would be more appropriate
  • it’s unclear how to navigate around the site
  • the site looks overwhelming with blocks of text
  • worst of all – the site wasn’t easily recognized as yours due to lack of branding or an inconsistent message so you did all the hard work in getting that engagement and then failed to capitalize
  • the website was hard to read, literally (this is especially relevant from tablets and mobile devices)
  • all the information required was gathered on the landing page

Analytics can help tackle the ‘responsive design’ issue easily – if your bounce rate is being influenced by poor interaction from tablets or phones.

Look at the data inside the section

Audience -> Mobile -> Overview

bounce rates

 

The first column will display how your visitors are accessing your site. In this case, nearly 47% use mobile devices, about 45% use desktops, and only 8% use tablets. Understanding this pattern will help you know if it is worth looking at the experience a mobile device user is having. If 90% plus of your clients are accessing your site from a desktop, it may be worth concentrating on them. This is highly unlikely and the trend towards mobile and away from desktops shows no sign of slowing.

bounce rates2

Following the data table along, look at ‘bounce rate’ as well as ‘pages per session’ and ‘average session duration’. If the visitors to your site are having trouble navigating your pages or reading your text, you would expect the bounce rate for those devices to be significantly higher than from a desktop. That would also translate into a lower number of pages viewed per session and a shorter session duration. In this example the site has the highest bounce rate from a desktop and the other values (between the two device types that make up over 91% of the traffic together) are very similar. The conclusion would be that this site is mobile friendly.

If you’re looking for help with your website, why not contact us today  info@trulium.com

Your Website – what first impression are you giving?

Over time it’s easy to become so familiar with your website that you lose sight of how it appears to a new visitor – a potential client clicking into your site for the first time. That first impression could be the difference between winning their business or losing them as they click into a competitor’s site.

What to avoid

  • excessive load times
  • be responsive and mobile readylimiting your audience by not being responsive – if your site can’t easily be viewed from a phone or tablet, your online visitor will find a site that is simple to navigate and read when it is convenient for them
  • error messages
  • outdated content
  • poor quality images
  • a confusing layout which makes the site (at least appear) difficult to navigate. This includes a page ‘heavy’ on text with no natural breaks or images. Nobody will read the entire page before they decide to find out more, they will jump between headings and scan the site to decide if they like it enough to keep looking
  • a generic site which hasn’t been branded – when a search pulls up your site and your potential customer clicks in, they scan the page to check they recognize a logo, location or slogan which reassures them they are on the business they thought they were

 

The next consideration is what first impression you would like to give. Are you trying to present information or encourage your visitor to explore your site?

If you are trying to draw clients literally to your place of business, consider maps and clear directions from major nearby cities.

First impressions count imageWhen your business is visual eg. florist, artist, designer, showcase your work so that a glance conveys your colors, style and design. Put your best images in the most prominent place as they are your ‘hook’ to spark more interest in exploring your site. Brand the image if necessary so that it is clear the image is your own and not a generic stock image. If you can’t choose or your product range is diverse, consider a scrolling gallery with 4 or 5 images which rotate.

Checklist

Imagine yourself in a potential client’s shoes (or ask someone you trust who is not familiar with your website for their opinion) and consider:

  • do the colors appeal
  • are my service or product clear to see
  • do I appear an expert in my field
  • does the site look professional and trustworthy
  • is any of the content out of date
  • do I have better images to represent my brand
  • is it clear how to contact the business
  • are the navigation menus intuitive
  • are there distractions drawing a client away from my content (eg excessive links or ads)
  • does the site reinforce the other branded material you are distributing? (business cards, shop front, advertising)
  • is there a link to social media so that it is easy to ‘follow’ you

 

first impressions countA website that looked great a few years ago may look tired to your audience today. If you are spending money on SEO (search Engine Optimization) to drive your site higher up the rankings, you need  positive first impressions to capitalize on your advantage and persuade prospects they have found exactly what they need as soon as they find your site.

 

If you’re ready to revisit the first impressions you are giving , contact us today  info@trulium.com

7 Ways to Improve Landing Page Design

A landing page is a simple, single web page that is designed to execute a single purpose. That purpose varies, of course. They’re essential for email collection, promotion for events, and even getting people to sign up for services. As simple as landing pages are, it’s important to keep them concise and to the point. Design is crucial for effective use of a landing page, and anything that reminds people of MS Paint should be re-evaluated immediately.

There are 7 ways to improve results when designing, and critiquing, your landing page:

  1. Announce What You Want
    A clear call-to-action is the biggest road to success on a landing page. The last thing you want a prospective client to do is guess.
  2. Announce Who Are You
    The very first step to ensuring that your questions will be satisfied is transparency. Your logo should be listed at the very top, right where everyone can see and confirm it. Be sure to list any trusted clients/partners in plain view as well.
  3. Show, Don’t Tell
    An unfortunate truth of busy professionals is that they don’t have time to read. Give them exactly what you mean and need in as little words as possible. Photos work nicely on the brain when it comes to sparking interest and keeping attention.
  4. Plain is Better
    Stuffing a million elements into one webpage (heavy with thick fonts and bold colors) is like giving your visitors a quick exit. There are plenty of ways to introduce typography and color into your landing page, but be sure to keep it as easy to navigate as possible.
  5. Keep It Simple
    Keep the amount of fields you introduce to a minimum. Ask the simple questions first and then, in further steps, introduce the more complicated ones. Questions should be condensed to minimize the amount needed and the amount of time spent answering them.
  6. No Brick Walls
    Give people exactly what you tell them they’ll get, every time. Promising a ‘free site review’ on one page and then demanding their email first is misleading. Heavy sighs are usually the only result of hard-to-get landing pages.
  7. Prove It Works
    A/B testing is basically putting two versions of a web page out to see which does better. It can help you solve that tricky ‘what’s working on this page’ problem that so many people go through. It gives you a direct view of what is getting results and what is setting you back. There are plenty of free tools to help with this, including Google Analytics. Some landing page apps also offer A/B testing, like Landerapp.com.

A well-designed landing page should be both quick for you and quick for your target audience. Keeping things simple, direct, and tested will assure that your landing page is delivering exactly what you need: results.